Qaraghandy, Karaganda

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"in central Kazakhstan, on the Trans-Kazakhstan RR. It consists of about 50 coal-mining settlements scattered around the central part of the city, and it is a leading industrial and cultural center of Kazakhstan. Its industries include iron and steel plants, flour mills, food and beverage plants, and factories that produce mining equipment, building materials, machinery, and footwear. Qaraghandy was founded in 1857 as a copper-mining settlement. The Qaraghandy coal basin, developed in the late 1920s, is a major producer of bituminous coal; near the city is apower station. The Irtysh-Qaraghandy Canal supplies the city with water." From the Columbia Encyclopedia [external link].

"central Kazakstan. It lies at the centre of the important Qaraghandy (Karaganda) coal basin. It is the second largest city in the republic and derives its name from the caragana bush, which grows abundantly in the surrounding steppe.

The first settlement appeared in 1856, and small-scale coal mining began in 1857 to supply a nearby copper smelter. Mining ceased in the 1920s but expanded quickly after 1931 following completion of a railway link and a decree that the Qaraghandy basin was to be developed as a major coal-mining area to supply industry in the Urals. Karaganda was made a city in 1934 and an oblast (province) administrative centre in 1936; by 1939 its population had swollen to 166,000. Forced labour was extensively used in its development.

The city's importance increased during World War II, when the Germans occupied the Donets basin, and the Parkhomenko coal-mining machinery works was among those evacuated to Karaganda. Coal mining and the production of coal-mining machinery still dominate Karaganda's industry, but there are also major iron and steel works, utilizing ore from Karazhal and Lisakovsk; in addition, there are large cement plants and also food and other light industries. By 1972 the concentration of industry in Karaganda had reduced water supplies in a region already semiarid and necessitated the construction of the Irtysh-Karaganda (Ertis-Qaraghandy) Canal, dedicated in that year.

The city consists of several dozen settlements scattered over an area of approximately 300 square miles (800 square km), but there are two main areas, the Old and New towns. The Old Town grew up in a haphazard fashion in the early years and includes more than 20 pit settlements, whereas the New Town, to the south, begun in 1934 and designed as the cultural and administrative centre, has wide streets, parks, and such monumental buildings as the Miners' Palace of Culture. There are several institutions of higher education, including a university (1972) and medical and polytechnic institutes. There are also a number of research and design institutes, a museum, theatres, a television centre, and a botanical garden." From the Encyclopaedia Britannica [external link].

"The city in central Kazakstan. It lies at the center of the important Karaganda coal basin. It is the second largest city in the republic and derives its name from the caragana bush, which grows abundantly in the surrounding steppe. The first settlement appeared in 1856, and small-scale coal mining began in 1857 to supply a nearby copper smelter. Coal mining and the production of coal-mining machinery still dominate Karaganda's industry, but there are also major iron and steel works, utilizing ore from Karazhal and Lisakovsk; in addition, there are large cement plants and also food and other light industries. The city consists of several dozen settlements scattered over an area of approximately 300 square miles (800 square km), but there are two main areas, the Old and New towns. The Old Town grew up in a haphazard fashion in the early years and includes more than 20 pit settlements, whereas the New Town was designed as the cultural and administrative centre, has wide streets, parks, and numerous monumental buildings. There are a few mosques and churches to see. Tours are available to Temirtau, 20 mi/30 km away, where there is a sports complex, a locally acclaimed children's park and the only German-language theater in Central Asia." Previously on the Gateway to Kazakhstan.

kzchat Pictures [external link] from Karaganda.

Maps
Europa-tech [external link] Karaganda area, shows nice detail of roads, small towns, and rail lines
Orphanages on Google Earth [external link]: Iskorka/Kulunshak orphanage is at 49.47'57.24"N, 73.05'16.38"E and the Nezaboodka baby orphanage is at 49.48'00.34"N, 73.04'02.68"E.
Karaganda Map with Kazakh nationality (click on map to see a larger image, shows location of Kazakhs) used with permission from World Map [external link].

Yahoo Group: Karaganda [external link] is for parents whose kids came from Karaganda or are waiting to travel. Yahoo Group: Karaganda Parents [external link] is for the post-adoption exchange of photos and information about life while in the orphanages. Only for post-adoptive families, not much activity since 2008.

Falling Rain [external link] has maps and current weather conditions (temperature, cloud cover and precipitation).

TSUM [external link] department store.

Karaganda State University [external link] is in English, Kazakh and Russian and Karaganda State Technical University [external link] is in English and Russian.

Wiki: Karaganda [external link]

Karaganda song [external link], Karaganda by Ritm Jizni [external link] and Our Karaganda [external link] YouTube videos with pictures from Karaganda.

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Visit Kazakhstan [external link] has information about the area, hotels, restaurants, etc.

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Aboutkazakhstan.com [external link]: population, hotels, city coat of arms, map, history, and pictures.

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Karaganda State Medical University [external link]

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There is a movie titled Karaganda [external link] from 2013: "A Jewish prisoner in a 1950s Soviet prison camp is on a mission to find his wife." It gets 7.6 stars, so it can't be too bad and from the trailer it looks like it has English subtitles.

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Passing Through and Doing Nothing in Karaganda [external link] pictures from a travel blogger.

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Ingvarr photo album [external link]

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Hotels

  • Sozvezdie [external link]: 22 double rooms and suites, air conditioning, hair dryer, TV, phone, refrigerator, restaurant, lounge, bar, business center, pool/sauna, laundry service, boutique. Doing an internet search you can find many hotel reservation sites listing this hotel.
  • Inturist
  • Cosmonaut [external link]: AC, minibar, TV, phone with internet, cribs available, sauna, pool, restaurant, 03/04 $65-105 includes breakfast. "April/May 2004: $65/night, private bathroom with tub and shower, hairdryer, minibar, refrigerator, heated, phone, TV, crib available, coffee shop, restaurant, bar, beauty salon, internet connection, accepts credit cards, staff speaks English, walking distance to shopping, 'Staff is completely accomodating. Will provide for all needs of adoptive parents...cribs, walkers, changing tables. Restaurant will prepare appropriate foods for baby. Hotel is very clean and comfortable. Babysitting service available. This hotel made a difference in changing my adoption trip into a comfortable vacation! Contact Kristen [e-mail link] for more information."
    "Mar-May 2004, 'This hotel is renovating into a 5 star hotel. We were very well treated and the staff were very helpful. It is walking distance to the Nebudyka Orphanage in Karaganda which was helpful during our bonding periods. They offered EVERYTHING!!! The food was excellent!!! Negotiate for prices. We paid $110/night but well worth the money and convenience. The director and staff are very accommodating to adoptive families.' Contact Day [e-mail link] for more information."
  • Kasakhstan
  • Karaganda Hotel: "Sept/Oct 2001, $18 for a standard room with two single beds, private bath with tub, refrigerator, crib available, Turkish restaurant, elevator, walking distance to shopping.
  • Chaika [external link] (Seagull): room service, restaurant, sauna, pool.
  • Premier: "October 2005, $23 single, private bath with tub, shower, phones, TV, beauty salon, walking distance to shopping. Contact Elena [e-mail link] for more details.
  • Hotel Dostar-Alem [external link]
  • Hotel Alatau [external link]
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Page last updated on 9 January 2016.

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